Royal Copenhagen Christmas plates

Royal Copenhagen Christmas plates are a wonderful decoration for the holiday table.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas plates are a wonderful decoration for the holiday table.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas plates are in demand among tourists and collectors.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas plates are in demand among tourists and collectors.

The Royal Danish porcelain factory Royal Copenhagen, which was founded in 1775, maintains the traditions of the past and still produces traditional hand-painted art porcelain. One of the traditions of the factory, which began in 1895, is the production of traditional Christmas plates Royal Copenhagen and Bing & Grøndah. The plot of each plate is related to Danish history and culture.

The idea for themed plates arose at the 1888 Nordic Exhibition of Industry, Agriculture and the Arts in Copenhagen. The huge event attracted 1.3 million guests in a country with a population of just 2 million people. The Royal Danish Porcelain Manufactory created the first series of themed plates as part of its exhibition at the fair. Among the guests of the exhibition were members of the royal family. Crown Princess Louise of Denmark purchased one of them as a souvenir of this grand event. Other visitors followed suit with such enthusiasm that the plant was forced to produce additional plates. Just like that, the perfect collectible was created that could be used to celebrate special occasions. In subsequent years, the Royal Danish Porcelain Factory began creating plates to commemorate various milestones in the life of the royal family.

Christmas plate 2024 from the Bing & Grøndahl “Christmas in the Country” series, designed by Dag Samsund.
Christmas plate 2024 from the Bing & Grøndahl “Christmas in the Country” series, designed by Dag Samsund.
Christmas plate 2024 from the Royal Copenhagen series Anticipation of Christmas, designed by Allan Terkelsen.
Christmas plate 2024 from the Royal Copenhagen series Anticipation of Christmas, designed by Allan Terkelsen.

In 1895 Hallin went to work for Bing & Grøndahl. Factory owner Harald Bing came up with the idea of using the relief technique to create collectible plates for the Christmas holidays. Thus, Bing & Grøndahl became the first to produce the annual Christmas plate exactly as we know it today. In 1908, Royal Copenhagen followed suit and produced its first annual plate using the Hallin relief technique. Both porcelain factories were merged in 1987, and since then two Christmas plates from each series have been produced every year, decorated in the traditional blue and white color scheme.

In addition to Christmas plates, the factory also produces other Christmas themed products figurines, dishes, and Christmas tree decorations.
In addition to Christmas plates, the factory also produces other Christmas themed products figurines, dishes, and Christmas tree decorations.

Royal Copenhagen’s 2004 annual plate is called “Christmas in the Country” and depicts a charming little scene where the geese have heard the farmer in the barn and are now eagerly awaiting their feed.

Virgin Mary with Child Jesus, designed by Christian Thomsen, 1908.
Virgin Mary with Child Jesus, designed by Christian Thomsen, 1908.
Adoration of the Magi, designed by Christian Thomsen, 1910.
Adoration of the Magi, designed by Christian Thomsen, 1910.
Elderly Couple at Table with a Small Christmas Tree, designed by Christian Thomsen, 1912.
Elderly Couple at Table with a Small Christmas Tree, designed by Christian Thomsen, 1912.
Old houses in Obenrå town square, designed by Oluf Jensen, 1921.
Old houses in Obenrå town square, designed by Oluf Jensen, 1921.
Schooner at Sea on Christmas Night, designed by Christiane Benjamin Olsen, 1924.
Schooner at Sea on Christmas Night, designed by Christiane Benjamin Olsen, 1924.
Old houses in Christianshavn, designed by Oluf Jensen, 1925.
Old houses in Christianshavn, designed by Oluf Jensen, 1925.
Vicar on his way to church, designed by Gottfred Rohde, 1928.
Vicar on his way to church, designed by Gottfred Rohde, 1928.
Old windmill in a snowy landscape, designed by Kai Lange, 1963.
Old windmill in a snowy landscape, designed by Kai Lange, 1963.
Hans Christian Andersen House, design by Sven Vestergaard, 2005.
Hans Christian Andersen House, design by Sven Vestergaard, 2005.
Christmas in the Woods, designed by Allan Terkelsen, 2023.
Christmas in the Woods, designed by Allan Terkelsen, 2023.
Behind the frozen window, design by F.A. Hallina, 1895.
Behind the frozen window, design by F.A. Hallina, 1895.
New moon over snow covered trees, design by F.A. Hallina, 1896.
New moon over snow covered trees, design by F.A. Hallina, 1896.
Christmas Church Bells Ringing, designed by Jens Peter Dahl Jensen, 1900.
Christmas Church Bells Ringing, designed by Jens Peter Dahl Jensen, 1900.
Royal Copenhagen The Three Wise Men, design by S. Sabra, 1901.
The Three Wise Men, design by S. Sabra, 1901.
Royal Copenhagen Waiting for Christmas Night, designed by Jens Peter Dahl Jensen, 1905.
Waiting for Christmas Night, designed by Jens Peter Dahl Jensen, 1905.
Royal Copenhagen The Little Match Girl, designed by E. Plocross, 1907.
The Little Match Girl, designed by E. Plocross, 1907.
Royal Copenhagen Ole Lukoje, designed by Immanuel Tierne, 1939.
Ole Lukoje, designed by Immanuel Tierne, 1939.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas Elf, designed by Henry Telander, 1963.
Christmas Elf, designed by Henry Telander, 1963.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas Letter, designed by Edward Jensen, 1984.
Letter, designed by Edward Jensen, 1984.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas Night, designed by Doug Samsund, 2022.
Christmas Night, designed by Doug Samsund, 2022.
Royal Copenhagen Christmas in Roskilde, designed by Dag Samsund, 2023.
Christmas in Roskilde, designed by Dag Samsund, Royal Copenhagen, 2023.
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